A path to tread.

This story is in commemoration of the International Women’s Day.

I woke up on the wrong side of bed on this Monday morning after sharing a beer with my in- law the previous night. I reluctantly got up and I had Monday blues to contend with. I did everything in slow motion until I arrived at Magodo bus stop which was about to 12 minutes walk from my apartment.


The crowd at the bus stop was unprecedented. I said, “Where is everyone headed?” An inner voice asked me the same rhetoric question- ” Where are you headed? ” This was about 7a.m. It was so plain to see that I was running late. Some people decided to trek when the commercial buses were not forthcoming.

I jumped on the board the band wagon. As I walked, I saw a young girl in her school uniform, trodding. I noticed her worn out shoes and her uniform was not ironed. She was unkempt. Her bag was dirty, torn, and light in weight. It was obvious that there were no books but one or two exercise books.


I fell into deep thoughts as I stole glances at the tired and famished young girl. I became a forest of ideas as it struck me to lend a hand. I tailed her while I walked to catch a bus, and suddenly, I saw a dilapidated sing post with the inscription ” Ehingbeti Girls School, Ketu”. The school building was nothing to write home about too.
“Our team at work could visit her school and donate some relief materials to the girls in the school”, I said, while I wondered how our leaders pay less attention to public schools.


As I walked, I heard a faint voice like my wife’s, rose to a crescendo, and I heard, ” wake up, breakfast is ready ” – that was when I realised I was in a dream. This Monday was a bank holiday.


“This dream must come to fruition to save and support the girl child’s education” I bellowed, and I sipped my cup of coffee.

They say “if you educate a woman, you educate a nation” The reason is simple. Women contribute immensely to family and societal growth and development.

Lending a hand is a good path to tread. Do it if you can. Don’t tarry.

What goes around, comes around.

Amorvard Foundation

In a little village called Tomo, Nike, an orphan was an epitome of beauty. She was referred to as the flavour of the village by her admirers. Ade was one of the boldest guys who could approach her and ask her out. In a short while, Ade and Nike became an item. Their relationship was on everyone’s lips. The villagers never cease to gossip them. Ade’s friends became envious and regretted not making the move to date Nike before Ade did.

Dayo who had lived in the city for years after graduation from the University, decided to return home as the government has been doing everything to promote agriculture and encourage farmers for self sufficiency in food production. Dayo moved to the village with his wife . His Dad had willed an expanse of land to him that he could conveniently farm on. He and his wife, Moyo have been married for 11 years without a child. Dayo was quite handsome, tall and lanky.

He had been under pressure to have at least a child . The thought of another wife, who could bear children for him crossed his mind often. “You’re barren” , he said to his wife each time they had a quarrel.

On the new yam festival day in the village, conviviality greeted the atmosphere. There was so much to eat and drink. Nike was all over the place like other girls and women who took care of the guests. Dayo couldn’t take his eyes off Nike. ” I am Dayo. What’s your name? ” , he approached Nike and they became friends sooner rather than later.

It was no longer a secret that Nike was pregnant. She couldn’t hide it anymore after seven months. Everyone who knew her with Ade concluded that Ade was responsible.

Dayo felt the pregnancy was his. Ade, the teacher and Dayo, the new mechanised farmer in the village, claimed to be responsible for Nike’s pregnancy. The solution to the deadlock was a DNA test which was advised by the medical doctor in charge of the health centre in the village . Pronto, the samples were taken and the test was carried out in the Capital city. When the result came, Dayo, who had always refused to subject himself to fertility test as advised by the family gynecologist lost out and Nike gave birth to a bouncing baby boy for Ade. This put an end to the secret love between Nike and Dayo.

Ade later found out that Nike had an affair with Dayo. He was devastated and he called it quits with Nike.

Nike went through thick and thin to bring up their son, Temi.

Temi was a brilliant boy. He came tops in class. He recognised the efforts his mum put in to see him through school, and took care of him with her meagre resources. These spurred him on and he was determined to make something out of life even though his father abandoned him and his mum.

He was very skillful as a footballer. He was always striking and scoring with precision. His coach fell in love with him and pushed for a scholarship for him. Temi plies his trade as a footballer in Europe now.

Temi is loaded. He helps indigent students in the village. He has relocated his mother, Nike to Europe.

Ade, is at the moment begging both Nike and Temi for forgiveness in spite of his marriage to another woman, who had two children for him. Temi refused to forgive him but he did not take out his displeasure for his father’s actions on his step sister, Dolapo and brother, Biodun, rather he showed them love. He offerred them scholarships to study abroad. By this action, Temi is worthy of emulation. He has set an example for others to follow in lending a hand.

Ade is not relenting in his plea. He sends emissaries to him especially after watching him play for his team. He still hopes that he will be forgiven for abandoning his son and Nike, who would have been his lovely wife.