A path to tread. By Kari Ukwatar

This story is in commemoration of the International Women’s Day.

I woke up on the wrong side of bed on this Monday morning after sharing a beer with my in- law the previous night. I reluctantly got up and I had Monday blues to contend with. I did everything in slow motion until I arrived at Magodo bus stop which was about to 12 minutes walk from my apartment.


The crowd at the bus stop was unprecedented. I said, “Where is everyone headed?” An inner voice asked me the same rhetoric question- ” Where are you headed? ” This was about 7a.m. It was so plain to see that I was running late. Some people decided to trek when the commercial buses were not forthcoming.

I jumped on the board the band wagon. As I walked, I saw a young girl in her school uniform, trodding. I noticed her worn out shoes and her uniform was not ironed. She was unkempt. Her bag was dirty, torn, and light in weight. It was obvious that there were no books but one or two exercise books.


I fell into deep thoughts as I stole glances at the tired and famished young girl. I became a forest of ideas as it struck me to lend a hand. I tailed her while I walked to catch a bus, and suddenly, I saw a dilapidated sing post with the inscription ” Ehingbeti Girls School, Ketu”. The school building was nothing to write home about too.
“Our team at work could visit her school and donate some relief materials to the girls in the school”, I said, while I wondered how our leaders pay less attention to public schools.


As I walked, I heard a faint voice like my wife’s, rose to a crescendo, and I heard, ” wake up, breakfast is ready ” – that was when I realised I was in a dream. This Monday was a bank holiday.


“This dream must come to fruition to save and support the girl child’s education” I bellowed, and I sipped my cup of coffee.

They say “if you educate a woman, you educate a nation” The reason is simple. Women contribute immensely to family and societal growth and development.

Lending a hand is a good path to tread. Do it if you can. Don’t tarry.

Lobular breast cancer &  other breast cancers.

Amorvard Foundation.


Compared to other types of breast cancer, lobular breast cancer:

Has different symptoms than other more common types of breast cancer.


May be harder to see on mammogram because it does not cause a firm or distinct lump.


May not be diagnosed until the cancer is large enough to cause symptoms.


Is more likely to involve both breasts and can reoccur many years after the first diagnosis.

Can spread to different-than-typical sites like the stomach, intestine, ovary, kidneys, ureters and eye.

The reason we are having this conversation is not to scare you but just so you are aware and to guide you to take the necessary steps to receiving the right treatment and adhering to recommeded treatment plan by your care team.

Who Should Get Tested

Amorvard Foundation

Folks who have symptoms of COVID-19.


Folks who have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.


Folks who have taken part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19 because they cannot socially distance as needed, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded indoor settings.


Folks who have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local external icon or state health department.


Not everyone will get tested. If you do get tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider.